Ramsey County
Soil Conservation District
706 8th Ave SE
Devils Lake, ND 58301
Office: 701-662-4088 Ext. 3
Cell: 701-739-4120

Tree Info

Ideal service to use for grass plantings for CRP or other programs

$30/acre ($250 min) (includes operator)

Shrubs

Russian Almond

A low, suckering shrub hardy, but not highly desirable for landscape purposes because it's suckering habit make it difficult to control. However, the dense thickets formed are excellent for wildlife food and cover. Abundant pink to rosy flowers in early spring.

Soil: Prefers loamy soils. Performs satisfactorily in heavy clay. Fair drought resistance.

Height: 4-5 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Buffaloberry

A tall, thorny, thicket-forming native shrub. Abundant small, red fruits. Highly important for mule deer browse. Ideal cover and nesting site for many birds. Preferred food source of many songbirds and sharptail grouse. Good late winter food source for birds.

Soil: Grows well in most soils. Drought tolerant. Not adapted to wet, poorly drained sites.

Height: 12-15 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Black Cherry

A medium sized, single to multi-stemmed tree native to the central and eastern United States. Leaves are shiny, long, and narrow. Fruit is similar to chokecherry but is more astringent in taste.

Soil: Prefers a deep, moist, well-drained soil. Can tolerate drought conditions. Not tolerant of high pH or saline soils.

Height: 10-25 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

 

Western Sandcherry

A small, winter-hardy, relatively short-lived shrub native to the Northern Great Plains. Edible fruits which are dark purple to black. Purpleleaf Sandcherry, a hybrid, is a popular landscape shrub.

Soil: Prefers loamy soils. Fair drought tolerance.

Height: 2-4 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Nanking Cherry

A winter hardy, moderately fast-growing. A broad spreading, densely twiggy shrub, becoming more open and picturesque with age. Also called Manchu cherry. Edible fruits are dark red and excellent for pies and jellies.

Fruit is relished by many songbirds. Browsed by rabbits, mice, and deer.

Soil: Prefers loamy soils. Tolerates considerable wind and dryness.

Height: 6-8 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Black Chokeberry

A medium sized, multi-stemmed shrub. Leaves are a shiny green turning wine red in the fall. White flower clusters followed by persistent fruits dark purple in color. Useful fruit for wine making.

Soil: Adapted to a wide range of soils. Drought tolerant.

Height: 5-8 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Chokecherry

This small suckering hardy tree or large shrub is native throughout North Dakota. Purple-leaved selections are popular landscape plants. Fruits commonly used for jellies and jams. One of the most important plants for food and cover.

Twigs and foliage are heavily browsed by deer.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soils. Moderate drought tolerance.

Height: 10-15 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Schubert Chokecherry

A large shrub native across the United States. Produces abundant small cherries suitable for jelly or wildlife. Leaves emerge green and hten change to purplish red in color. Fruit is the same as common chokecherry.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soils. Moderate drought tolerance.

Height: 10-15 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

 

American Cranberry Bush

A large, leggy, multi-stemmed native shrub found in wooded, usually moist areas. May be taller on partially shaded sides. Large white flower clusters appear in late May followed by orange/red to deep red fruits.

Soil: Does best on well-drained sites with better than average moisture. Prefers fertile, loamy soils.

Height: 6-12 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Pekin Cotoneaster

An upright, round-topped shrub. Foliage is a shiny green, fruit is nearly black.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils. Likes sites with moisture or high water table. Does not do well on droughty or poorly-drained soils.

Height: 6-8 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Golden Currant

A small upright shrub native to western United States. Well-adapted to growing conditions in the north. Fragrant, yellow, clove-scented flowers producing a dark purple fruit suitalbe for wildlife and jellies.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils, tolerant of saline soils. Fairly drought tolerant.

Height: 5-6 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Redosier Dogwood

An open, spreading, multi-stemmed, medium to large shrub with horizontal branches at the base. It spreads by natural layering of lower, relatively prostrate stems. Dar, blood-red bark provides winter color.

Soil: Adaptable to a variety of soils. Grows best in moist to somewhat wet loams.

Height: 6-10 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Caragana

Upright shrub. Yellow flowers followed by seed bearing pods. Ability to withstand extreme cold and dryness. Major windbreak species. Used for nesting by several species of songbirds. Food source for hummingbirds.

Soil: Adapted to a wide range of soils. Drought tolerant. Does not perform well on very wet or very dry, sandy soils.

Height: 12-14 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

False Indigo

A native multi-stemmed shrub growing along waterways. Has pinnately compound leaves and dark purple flowers followed by small pods. Subject to periodic diebak and regrowth which may be accentuated by drought.

Soil: Adaptable to a variety of soils. Prefers above average moisture conditions.

Height: 4-7 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Juneberry

A hardy, medium to tall, suckering shrub, native to prairie hillsides and woody draws. Also called Saskatoon and Serviceberry. White flowers followed by an edible fruit. Fruits are highly prized for food.

Soil: Prefers loam to sandy loam soil high in organic matter. Needs adequate moisture to bear fruit. Limited drought tolerance, does not withstand ponding.

Height: 8-10 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-18"

 

Common Lilac

A medium to large hardy shrub with stout, spreading branches developing a somewhat oval to irregularly rounded crown. Spreads by suckering. Showy, fragrant flowers.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soils. Limited drought tolerance, does not withstand ponding.

Height: 8-12 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Villosa (Late) Lilac

A dense tall shrub with stout ascending branches. This species blooms later than the common lilac. Lavender/pinkish flowers fade to gray-white. Does not sucker.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soils. Less drought tolerant than common lilac. Does not withstand ponding.

Height: 8-12 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

American Plum

The wild plum is a native tall shrub to small tree which is thorny, winter-hardy, and thicket-forming. White flowers appear in early May followed by edible fruit used to make preserves and jellies.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Fair to good drought tolerance.

Height: 8-12 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

 

Hansen Hedge Rose

A medium to tall thorny shrub rose that is adapted to the Northern Plains. The fruit is referred to as a rose hip and is a source of Vitamin C. Showy, pink flowers.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Intermediate drought tolerance.

Height: 4-6 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Woods Rose

A hardy, low to medium growing, throny shrub. Growth is upright to arching, roots sucker to form a dense thicket. The single pink flowers are followed by red rose hips.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Intermediate drought tolerance.

Height: 3-5 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Skunkbush Sumac

Native to the Northern Plains. Spreading shrub, smaller and finer-textured leaves than Fragrant Sumac. Forms a dense mass of stems and leaves. Scented leaves and light yellow flowers.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Moderately drought tolerant. Survives harsh growing conditions of North Dakota Bandlands.

Height: 4-6 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Smooth Sumac

A large, loose, open-spreading shrub with a flattish crown. Usually grows in masses and suckers profusely. Outstanding red fall color. Similar to Staghorn sumac but shorter.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Moderately drought tolerant. Available water determines mature plant height.

Height: 5-10 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Aromatic Sumac

Spreading shrub with branches turning up at the tip. Tends to form a dense mass of stems and leaves. Good for bank stabilization Fragrant aromatic leaves, particularly when crushed. Yellow catkin-like flowers.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils. Moderately drought tolerant.

Height: 3-9 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Sandbur Willow

A medium shrub, native along riverbanks, lakes and sloughs throughout most of North Dakota. Suckers profusely.

Soil: Performs best on deep, moist loams; found along stream beds. Does well in moist sites and survives severe flooding. Not drought tolerant.

Height: 5-10 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

'Meadowlark' Forsythia

Typically blooms in early to mid-April. Flower bloom only on older plants. Leaves emerge shortly after flowering. Forsythia leaves are medium to dark green in summer. Fall leaf color is usually poor. Occasionally, however, the leaves may turn pale yellow to reddish purple in fall. Forsythias are one of the last deciduous shrubs to drop their leaves in fall.

Soil: Prefers clay to loam soils. Coarse, textured, droughty soils should be avoided. Avoid droughty or ponded sites.

Height: 6-11 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Honeysuckle

A medium-tall, open, irregular deciduous shrub with slender, spreading and arching branches. Resitant to the Russian honeysuckle aphid. Dull-colored foliage.

Soil: Adaptable to a variety of soils. Somewhat drought tolerant.

Height: 8-12 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Seaberry

A medium to tall, multi-stemmed suckering shrub. The fruit is produced in clusters along the stems, it is very astringent but high in Vitamin C.

Soil: Adaptable to a variety of soils. Tolerant of dry soils, high pH, and salinity.

Height: 8-14 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

 

Silverberry

A hardy, alkaline tolerant and drought tolerant shrub. An excellent shrub for dry, exposed sites. Will sucker profusely.

Soil: Prefers subsoil moisture as opposed to water-logged or ponded sites. Drought, and alkaline tolerant.

Height: 5-9 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Black Currant

American black currant is a native shrub species with erect branches lacking spines, on multiple stems. Small flowers open in May and have five yellow petals. Drooping racemes produce glossy, red-purple to nearly black fruit in August-September. The globose berries are smooth and contain many seeds. Ripe fruits are sweet and desirable for human consumption.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil types. Prefers moist, well drained sites.

Height: 3-6 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Medium Trees

Hardy Apricot

A small rounded, low branched tree. It produces white to pink flowers in May followed by small edible fruit which ripens in July and August.

Soil: Grows best in loam soils. Moderately drought tolerant. Will not withstand pounding or saturated soils.

Height: 12-16 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Midwest Crabapple

Crabapples are a group of small flowering trees used for conservation and landscape plantings. They are valued for their foliage, fruit, flowers, wildlife benefits, and variations in form and size.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils, prefer a heavy loam soil. Need well-drained, moist soils.

Height: 12-16 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Red Splendor Crabapple

Grown for its showy flowers and attractive fruit. Tree size, fruit size and branching habit can vary. Produces pink flowers followed by a red fruit.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils, prefers heavy loam soil. Need well-drained, moist soils.

Height: 15-25 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Siberian Crabapple

Crabapples are a group of small flowering trees used for conservation and landscape plantings. They are valued for their foliage, fruit, flowers, wildlife benefits, and variations in form and size.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils, prefers heavy loam, well-drained, moist soil.

Height: 15-25 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Amur Maple

A tall shrub or small tree native to northern Asia. Subject to cholorosis on heavy alkaline soils, and susceptible to 2, 4-D injury. Popular as a small, multi-stemmed specimen tree. Outstanding bright reddish fall colors are influenced by soil conditions and the cultivar grown.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils, except alkaline or poorly-drained soils. Moderately drought tolerant.

Height: 15-20 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Ussurian Pear

The hardiest of all pears, introduced from northeastern Asia. White flowers, semi-glossy foliage and dense, variably-rounded forms are of particular interest. White flowers appear in May followed by a small greenish-yellow fruit in fall.

Soil: Prefers clay loam to sandy loam soils. Requires well drained soil.

Height: 25-35 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

Laurel Willow

A small to medium-sized tree that is often seen in a shrubby form. One of the first to leaf out in spring and last to drop its leaves in autumn. Attractive, highly glossy leaves and round crown.

Soil: Preferes clay loam to sandy loam soils. Requires well drained soil.

Height: 25-35 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Russian Olive

Small tree, sometimes referred to as a large shrub, introduced from Russia. Tolerates saline/alkaline soils. May invade unmanaged bottomlands and moist pastures. Thorny. Silvery leaf color. Leaves retained very late into fall.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soils. Drought resistant. Does not withstand ponding.

Height: 15-25 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Ohio Buckeye

A medium-sized tree with an oval to rounded crown. Unique characteristics include palmate compound leaves, terminal candle-like flowers and large globose fruits.

Soil: Adaptable to a variety of soils, prefers moist loams. Leaf scorch is a problem on dry sites. Not drought resistant.

Height: 20-40 feet

 

Arnold Hawthorn

Broadly rounded, low-branched tree with wide-spreading, horizontal branches which are densely set. This species performs well in North Dakota. Attractive white flowers and red fruit, thorny stems.

Soil: Adapted to a variety of soils. Prefers well drained soils. Moderately drought resistant.

Height: 14-20 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Large Trees

Quacking Aspen

Aspen trees grow fairly straight and become clear of lower limbs over time. Sometimes called Trembling Aspen because it's leaves tremble in a light breeze due to their flattened petioles. Most extensive native rnage of any tree in North America. Rapidly recolonizes disturbed sites (after fire, logging, etc.)

Soil: Prefers sands to loam but tolerates variable soil conditions. Needs a moist site to do well. Primarily present in areas of high water table, north and east facing slopes, seeps and other moist areas.

Height: 25-60 feet

Available in: 1 gallon: $6.50, Plant Bands: $4.00

 

Green Ash

A hardy, native, drought and alkali resistant medium to large tree. Since the onset of Dutch elm disease, Green Ash has been planted in urban and conservation settings as a replacement for American Elm.

Soil: Adapted to a wide variety of soil textures. Can withstand flooding for short periods of time, moderately high drought tolerance.

Height: 35-65 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft., 5 ft., 6 ft.

 

Boxelder

A relatively fast-growing, short-lived, medium to tall tree of irregular form. Native to river bottoms, ravines and hillsides. Foliage is very susceptible to phenoxy hericides. Also called Manitoba maple or ash-leaved maple.

Soil: Adapted to a wide range of soils. Does best on well-drained moist soils along stream banks, but moderately drought tolerant.

Height: 40-50 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Native (Plains) Cottonwood

The largest and fastest growing tree in the state. It grows along waterways and wet meadows throughout the Plains states. Greater drought and alkalinity tolerance than many of the poplar cultivars but is susceptible to leaf rust and canker diseases. Produces seed in tufts of "cotton".

Soil: Loam to sands are most favorable. Requires a moist site. Tolerates drought on upland sites with high water table.

Height: 40-70 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft., 5 ft.

 

Siouxland Cottonwood

Large, vigorous cottonless male tree. Spreading crown in open areas but with a tall, central trunk when crowded. Selected for leaf rust resistance.

Soil: Loams to sands are most favorable. Requires a moist site. Tolerates drought on upland sites with high water table.

Height: 40-70 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft., 5 ft.

 

Freeman Maple

A hybrid of the red and silver maples that combines the best of both species: good form and excellent red autumn color from the Red Maple; fast growth and tolerance to adverse climatic and soil conditions from the Silver Maple.

Soil: Prefers rich, well drained soils but it is fairly tolerant to heavy soils and will tolerate dry or wet neutral sites, not tolerant of high soil pH.

Height: 40-60 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Weeping Willow

Graceful and refined, easily recognized by its open crown of ground-sweeping branches. Leaves are light green above, grayish-green below.

Soil: Grows well on most soil types including alkaline, moist, and sandy soils. It is drought and flood tolerant.

Height: 30-40 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Golden Willow

A large low-branching tree forming a broad round topped crown with slender, drooping branches. Brought over from Europe and central Asia. Widely planted as a yard tree. It's branches shed easily throughout the season and make it somewhat of a nuisance tree in yards.

Soil: Performs best on deep, moist loams, or along stream beds and wetlands will survive severe flooding. Often dies back during periods of extended drought.

Height: 40-55 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Black Walnut

A large oval to rounded, somewhat open-crowned tree. Considered the most valuable timber tree. The tree is borderline hardy in North Dakota and some seedling sources will be subject to winter dieback.

Soil: Sensitive to soil conditions. Does best on deep, well-drained, fertile, loamy soils. Does not withstand extended ponding or drought.

Height: 35-60 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Bur Oak

A large long-lived tree on good sites, with stout limbs forming a broad crown at maturity. Once established trees grow one to two feet per year on favorable sites. Produces acorns.

Soil: Grows best in fertile loam, but will do well in a wide variety of soils Drought tolreant, but prefers moist well-drained soils.

Height: 40-70 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Littleleaf Linden

Medium-sized tree native to Europe, with a strikingly dense pyramidal to round crown. Desirable specimen tree in the landscape. The flowers are highly fragrant and attractive to bees

Soil: Grows well on deep, fertile, well-drained loam and clay soils. Intermediate tolerance to flooding. Not drought resistant. May develop leaf scorch under drought conditions.

Height: 30-45 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft.

 

Hackberry

A medium-sized tree native to North Dakota. A good replacement tree for the American Elm because of it's similar form and adaptability. Gray, unique stucco-like bark.

Soil: Performs well on a variety of soils. Moderately drought tolerant but does best on moist, well drained site. May compensate for droughty conditions by dropping a portion of the leaves when under stress.

Height: 40-60 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft.

 

Paper Birch

An upright to pyramidal growing tree becoming rounded with age. Grown as a single or multi-stemmed plant. Bark copper to red brown color when young, becoming white to creamy white after 3-4 years. The bark often peels and rolls on older plants. Drought stress followed by borer attack often causes decline.

Soil: Does best on loamy or sandy soils along rivers, lake or ravines. Likes well-drained, moist site. Does not tolerate drought.

Height: 30-55 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

 

White Poplar

Medium to tall tree sometimes confused with Silver Maple since the leaves on long shoots are maple-shaped, while leaves on short shoots are more like aspen leaves in shape.

Soil: Clay to snady soils. Appears slightly more drought tolerant than cottonwood, but extended periods of drought may cause dieback.

Height: 40-60 feet

Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft. 4 ft., 5 ft.

 

 

Robusta/Hybrid Poplar

A large, vigorous, upright tree. The hybrid grows extrememly fast but lacks cold and drought hardiness. The robusta is resistant to leaf rust but is susceptible to cankers.

Soil: Requires a moist site. Will not tolerate drought on upland sites. Less tolerant of moisture stress than is cottonwood. High water table required on coarse-textured soils.

Height: 40-60 feet

Robusta Available in: Conservation Grade-12"

Hybrid Available in: Conservation Grade-12", 3 ft., 4 ft., 5 ft.

 

Conifers & Vines

Eastern Red Cedar

Grows in a pyramid shape. The top rounds off as it grows older. Produces a blue waxy berry. Slow growing tree that can develop a brownish tint in the winter.

Soil: Adapted to most soil types. Extremely drought tolerant.

Height: 40-50 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-15", Container - 8-16"

 

Rocky Mountain Juniper

A small to medium tree, typically with a dense pyramidal crown. Native to western North Dakota. Seedling planting may exhibit a wide variety of forms. Many denser growing cultivars are used as ornamentals.

Soil: Prefers deep moist well-drained loam, but will tolerate sandy soils. Extremely drought tolerant once established, but likes moist soils.

Height: 20-40 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-15", Container - 8-16"

 

Ponderosa Pine

A large tree native to southwestern North Dakota that is pyramidal when young, becoming irregularly-oblong and open-crowned with age.

Soil: Grows best on deep, well-drained loam soils, but will tolerate sandy soils. Prefers moist, well-drained soils for best growth. Tolerates drought. Does not tolerate flooding or poorly-drained soils.

Height: 50-70 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-12", Container - 7-12"

 

Scotch Pine

A medium to large tree, typically pyramidal when young, becoming more rounded and open with age. Orange/brown peeling bark. Bark is relished by porcupines, which can cause extensive damage.

Soil: Prefers moist, well-drained soils, but will tolerate drier site. Does not tolerate flooding. Not very drought resistant, but requires a well-drained site.

Height: 25-50 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-14", Container - 7-18"

 

Black Hills Spruce

A large tree, very dense and pyramidal when young. Not as drought tolerant as Colorado Spruce. Black Hills Spruce is a naturally occurring variety of white spruce native to South Dakota.

Soil: Grows best on moist loams. Fairly drought resistant. Needs additional moisture during droughts.

Height: 30-60 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-15", 12-24"; Container - 8-16"

 

Colorado Blue Spruce

A broad, dense pyramidal tree with stiff branches horizontal to the ground. Native to intermountain states of the west. Choice specimen tree.

Soil: Performs best on moist, well-drained loams. Does not tolerate flooding. Prefers moist areas, but is the most drought tolerant of the spruces.

Height: 30-65 feet

Available in: Bare Root - 8-15", 12-24"; Container - 8-16"

 

Siberian Larch

A large pyramidal deciduous conifer with spreading horizontal branches. Needles are densely clustered on short spurs. Needles turn attractive yellow and are shed each fall.

Soil: Intolerant of dry, heavy, shallow, chalky soils. Prefers moist well-drained site, but trial plantings on dry sites are performing well.

Height: 30-60 feet

Available in: Container - 8-16"

 

Bittersweet

A native vine which climbs by twisting it's stems around tree branches or fences. Female plants produce fruit in hanging cluster which will split open to show bright orange-red berries. Can kill trees and may be difficult to control.

Soil: Adapted to most soil types. Medium drought tolerance.

Height: 20-30 feet

 

 

Riverbank Grape

This is a native woody perennial vine. It usually climbs trees, shrubs, or fence rows. The blooming period occurs during the late spring and lasts about 2 weeks. The flowers have a sweet musky fragrance. They are replaced by berries that develop during the summer. Mature berries are dark violet with a whitish bloom.

Soil: Adapted to most soil types. Medium drought tolerance.

Height: 20-45 feet

 

Woodbine

A climbing vine native to woodlands throughout the Midwest. Fruit are bule-black berries utilized by birds. Bright red fall leaves.

Soil: Adapted to most soil types. Prefers course textured soils. Medium drought tolerance.

Height: 20-45 feet